TANTRIC

Psyko Steve Presents:

TANTRIC

KIRRA, RADIOFIX, YOUNG'S MODULUS

Sun, August 6, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Rebel Lounge

Phoenix, AZ

$15.00 - $17.00

Tickets at the Door

This event is 21 and over

TANTRIC
TANTRIC
To hear the soundtrack running through Hugo Ferreira’s head, just listen to the 13 songs on the new Tantric album. With more than 50 minutes of visceral, diverse rock, 37 Channels musically mines the soul of the Tantric singer, letting listeners inside the band’s most personal and evocative album to date—and that’s saying something for a platinum-selling group with hit singles including ‘Breakdown” and “Down and Out.” Of heady new songs like “Loss for Words,” “Where Do We Go From Here?” and “Broken,” Ferreira explains with a laugh: “I can’t afford a therapist, so this is what I do. I regurgitate all my angst and pain and confusion and joy. I’m showing more, letting people into my brain and heart.”

Helping give life to 37 Channels are an impressive list of players and friends, including Shooter Jennings (on the quirky “Mosquita”); Leif Garrett, bluesy rhythm guitarist Kenny Olson (Kid Rock); Hinder singer Austin Winkler (co-vocals to “Fault” and “Bullet”); Saving Abel guitarist Scott Bartlett, Uncle Kracker axeman Kevin McCreery; and drummer Greg Upchurch (3 Doors Down). But make no mistake; if Ferreira is the only original member, 37 Channels is still very much a Tantric record: “It’s always been my baby, I’m still the guy who co-founded the band back in Louisville,” he explains. “I’ve had different incarnations throughout the years, and the sounds have changed with the different players, but his is the most “Tantric” Tantric record so far. I even did my own harmony vocals. The whole album is very articulate to what I wanted it to sound like.” While the record’s guest list is impressive, the big names are tasteful additions, not flashy add-ons. Ferreira puts it more bluntly: “I didn’t let people jerk off all over this record! I’m very protective of it. I used to let things go, but I literally oversaw every aspect of 37 Channels.”

That included writing 116 songs, recording 19, and in order to create the uncompromised music he heard in his head, playing all the instruments himself on initial versions of the songs. When he was happy with a tune, he’d then enlist the players to execute it best. “I’m a good guitar player, I'm a great piano player, I’m an ok drummer and I’m a good bass player,” he relates. “But I’m really more of a songwriter and singer than anything.” Producing the record himself (in addition to doing one song with Fuel/Collective Soul producer Malcolm Springer) Ferreira tracked 37 Channels at Nashville’s Rivergate Studios. “It was great after spending two and a half years writing at home.” Of that lengthy songwriting process, the frontman explains, “Even if a song isn’t about something that happened to me, whether it’s me thinking about that poor guy who just walked by looked hungry or whatever, I’m always cognitively thinking. My head doesn’t have a shut off switch, and the record reflects that in all the different subject matter. ‘Mosquita’ has a comical undertone, but ‘You Got What You Wanted’ and ‘Loss for Words’ are very serious songs—and they’re interconnected.”

The album title, as might be clear, references the myriad of topics playing in the singer’s mind at any given time, and comes from a lyric in the song “Rise.” “I’m the poster child for ADD,” he says, “but. I choose not to medicate for that. I’m super hyper, and when people meet me, they’re like “there are a lot of tangents on this kid!’ Or, as he also analogizes: “There are a lot of branches in this tree, and I hop from one to another a lot. The only time I can focus is when I’m in the studio and I’m by myself, with a little bottle of vodka and a pack of cigarettes.”

Despite the sometimes-painful lyrical content, 37 Channels is often a fun record, especially on tracks like “Mosquita” and ‘My Turn,’ where Ferreira, who calls himself “the antithesis of a rock star!” has a blast randomly ranting and raving. Looking back at the last several years of work that led up to 37 Channels and a new record deal for Tantric, he doesn’t regret the time taken, nor place in the current music milieu. He believes this new record has taken—and needed--his lifetime to write: “There are bits and pieces of my entire life in this record, so it really did take my whole life, and that’s why it can only be written and recorded in this way.”

As 37 Channels makes clear, Tantric is a career band at the peak of its powers, as will be borne out by a tour later this year. While there’s diversity within and among the records, the signature Ferreira vocals and sensibilities shine through. As he concludes, “I consider Tantric a boat that I float in—it’s a vessel that carries the music. So I never feel restrictions. It doesn’t have any rules. Tantric music can be super-heavy, light--or both It’s really an open book with no ending in sight.”
KIRRA
KIRRA
Kirra is a rock and roll band based out of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, with a strong emphasis on the word “Rock” meaning “Straight up and raw” as guitarist Daxton Page puts it when referring to their new upcoming debut album titled “Run Away.” Some of the bands influences range from Chevelle, Tool, Five Finger Death Punch, Seether, or simply stated, “Rock Music” in general.

The band was created when guitarist Daxton Page left a rock school program and was interested in starting a band. “Through friends of friends, I met Zach. We jammed a few times but we were looking for a bassist/singer. After a few weeks of searching, Ryne answered our ad and told us he had a friend Jesse who could sing and play guitar. During our first practice we wrote "Drown" off our EP.”

The EP “Sounds from an Empty Room” which was released digitally included the song called “Downfall” that immediately grabbed the attention of internet radio and social media fans. Shortly after, the band decided to continue writing for an album as lead singer Jesse Williamson recalls. “At the beginning we were just writing machines and still are, we write as often as we can whether it's riffs, chorus ideas, breakdowns, etc. We just like to constantly be writing and we had had these songs for a while and figured we should record them.”

Having music as the band’s release, “Run Away” (available January 24, 2015) has a little of everything in it lyrically, but more specific is the statement they wanted to make musically. “We wanted to make a statement about overproduction in the rock world today” Daxton mentions. “We used 0% click-tracks, and wanted to make this as raw as we possibly could. I feel “Run Away” album is a direct reflection of where we are musically and mentally and we are excited about it.”

Kirra’s first live performance show was with Freddy Salazar and his band, and not long after they found themselves being invited to open for such acts as 3 Doors Down, Primer 55, Screaming for Silence, Saving Able, and Kill Devil Hill with new invitations on the horizon with such bands as Puddle of Mudd and venues like House of Blues in Hollywood, CA. “The people that are fans have always treated us well at shows, and even people that have never seen us before usually end up liking us. Which is great to know that there are still fans of rock music that isn't extreme/death/black metal.

“It's true no matter what Gene Simmons or anyone says. Rock is NOT dead.”
RADIOFIX
RADIOFIX
YOUNG'S MODULUS
YOUNG'S MODULUS
The term “Young’s Modulus” is named for 18th century physician and physicist Thomas Young. Scientifically, Young’s Modulus is the relationship between stress and strain in a material. Musically, Young’s Modulus creates elastic alternative rock sounds that are the perfect balance of nostalgia and modern day. The music is reminiscent of ‘90s era grunge yet relevant and authentic enough to take you on an aural rock ‘n roll joyride!

With the release of their debut album in July of 2016, Young’s Modulus’ sound has been equated to that of early King’s of Leon, Pearl Jam and Stone Temple Pilots. Somnambulist received wide-spread support and acclaim and was named as one of the best local albums of 2016. As Mitchell Hillman describes: “If '90s music comforts your soul, you will want to get a hold of Somnambulist immediately” (Phoenix New Times, July 2016).
Venue Information:
The Rebel Lounge
2303 E. Indian School Road
Phoenix, AZ, 85016
http://www.therebellounge.com/